Mind Mapping Techniques

Mind Mapping Techniques

Mind mapping is a simple process: start with a general concept and branch out from there, adding details and ideas as your map expands. If you don't know where to start, we’ve listed some popular mind mapping applications below.

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Mind Mapping Guidelines

Before you begin, keep in mind these general guidelines for mind mapping:

  • Colors and images can be used to great effect. Try outlining your most exciting ideas in a particular color, or color-coding your levels for a polished look. Adding doodles, sketches, and photographs, along with key phrases, can open up your mind and improve results

  • Always begin in the middle of your map with a general idea or topic. Then, branch outward with specific supporting thoughts.

  • If you’re crunched for time, online mind mapping tools make it easy to quickly type out your ideas and regroup them later. Don’t worry about creating a great-looking diagram right away—instead, focus on getting your ideas in a visible format.

  • The more you mind map, the better you’ll become. Instead of feeling uncertain about your ideas or the way you’ve recorded them, you’ll learn how to effectively record what you need to know.

Mind Maps for Task Management

Using mind maps to manage tasks and projects may seem counterintuitive; how can a freewheeling diagram get people to buckle down? Because of their high-level presentation of goals and necessary tasks, mind maps can effectively motivate and educate your team.

1.

Begin with a holistic view by asking yourself questions like,

What is the scope of this project? How long will it last?
Which resources do we have on hand? What will we have to acquire?
Who are the key stakeholders and what do they need?
How will we communicate hold-ups, changes, and progress?

2.

Once this information is gathered, you can use mind maps to represent the main areas of concern. Use them to illustrate the big-picture view of projects.

3.

Tackle the details by planning your daily, weekly, or quarterly tasks with mind mapping software. For example, if an important presentation needs to be completed by Friday, you might label the center “Presentation prep” and use branches to list sub-tasks that must be completed.

4.

Share these creations with your team members to get their input and hold them accountable for their share of the work. They’ll have a greater understanding of expectations with a mind map that clearly demonstrates key objectives, resource allocation, and the rationale behind decision-making.


Mind Maps for Note-taking

Mind mapping allows students to synthesize information in a way that suits individual learning styles. Whether you’re studying for a test or reviewing notes, you’ll be able to grasp key points quickly, since everything is laid out in a compact, visually appealing format.

1.

Lay a good foundation before the lecture or meeting begins by recording your current state of mind. If you know what the topic is, take a few minutes to write down your feelings about it. What do you already know about this subject? What do you want to learn by the end of the presentation? By stating your objectives, you’re more likely to find the answers. You can either use these notes to begin your mind map, or start from scratch once the presentation is underway.

2.

Label the center of your mind map with the meeting title or lecture topic. As you listen and participate, add new topics when they materialize. If you don’t have time to organize each element perfectly, just jot down the idea and restructure later.

3.

Remember that keywords and images can be highly effective methods of communication. Record information in a way that makes sense to you, rather than to the presenter or even to other students.

4.

To memorize this information, review your notes progressively less frequently—once a day at first, then a few times per week, and so on. To make sure you have a deep understanding of the material, try making a copy of your original notes. Then compare the two versions. If a topic was left out, you should probably study it more extensively.

Mind Mapping for Education

Mind Maps for Brainstorming

When you need to generate new ideas, mind mapping is the simplest and most effective solution. Mind maps can be used individually or in a group setting to spark creativity and record original ideas.

1.

Begin with a central product or idea. The point of brainstorming is to overcome any natural judgment that you might place on your ideas, in order to record as many ideas as possible. Spur your creativity by asking questions like:

What properties does this idea have? Pros and cons?
Are there any alternatives we haven’t explored?
How would a particular team member approach this? Which ideas would they prefer?

2.

Use these questions to write down as many ideas as you can think up. If it’s difficult for you to put a concept into words, a simple symbol or doodle can serve as a placeholder.

3.

When you’ve recorded enough ideas, it’s time to restructure them. Group each image or phrase as general concepts, then organize them into sub-groups. Finally, place these ideas inside shapes and connect them with lines so the most general thoughts are in the center of the mind map and the most specific ones are on the outside edges.

4.

Now you can turn a critical eye toward your ideas. Determine which ones are most feasible—you may need to ask for outside opinions at this stage. When you have a working list of great ideas, your brainstorming is complete.

Mind Mapping for Brainstorming

Mind Maps for Presenting

Mind maps can aid you in developing stories, speeches, formal proposals, and slideshow presentations. The mind mapping process will help you craft engaging introductions and supporting points, so the audience doesn’t get bored.

1.

After you’ve done initial research on your topic, take some time to approach it from another perspective: that of an audience member. Why would they want to listen to your presentation? What’s in it for them? When you’ve figured out the single most compelling answer, write it in the middle of the map. This is how you’ll introduce your topic. You can tell a story, show a video, or simply talk, but be sure to tell them why the presentation is worth their time.

2.

Now you can outline your main points. With key phrases, outline what you’ll tell your audience. Your topics should answer these questions:

  • What information will your presentation cover?
  • How do audience members put your tips into action?
  • What if something goes wrong? Are there any alternatives?

3.

Like any mind map, your outline should start with general topics and finish with specifics. Follow this pattern as you present; it helps you stay focused on the most important parts of your speech. It also gives you the flexibility to abandon less critical details, with your audience none the wiser.

Mind Mapping Techniques for Presenting

For a streamlined mind mapping experience, try Lucidchart. Its mind map library is sleek and easy to use, with simple keyboard shortcuts that save you time. Create polished, professional mind maps with our software, then easily share across any platform.

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